Card Basket Variation Block and Free-Motion Quilting

Welcome to Block 5 of the BERNINA’s Block of the Month Series. This month we will create a Card Basket Variation Block. We will make three of the same 12″ block and set them aside until we are ready to add the sashing and to put the final quilt together. Below is a picture of how the blocks will look when the entire quilt is finished.

Card Basket Variation Block

NOTE: The quilting I used in the finished quilt is a bit different than what I will show you today in our quilting lesson.

Fabric

If you are buying fabric for each block on a monthly basis, you will need three fabrics for this block; a yellow, a pink and the gray background fabric.

Please see more details about fabric requirements here. You will follow the Alternate Cutting Instructions below if you are cutting from a kit.

Please also download the BERNINA Block Party Fabric Chart.

If you are using the Sun Print 2017 Andover fabric line by Alison Glass, the specific colors are listed in bold: 

Fabric A Yellow A-8482-Y 1/4 Yard

Fabric A - Yellow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fabric B Pink A-8484-E 1/4 Yard

 Fabric B - Pink

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fabric C Gray A-C-Black 1/4 Yard

Background Fabric - Gray

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Materials to Create a Card Basket Variation Block :

BERNINA Patchwork Foot #37/37D or #57/57D or #97/97D

BERNINA Stitch Regulator

OR one of the following free-motion feet:

Darning Foot #9

Embroidery Foot #15

Echo Quilting and Cutwork Foot #44

Free-Motion Embroidery Foot #24

Quilting Foot #29

Quilting Foot #29C

Cutting Instructions

Fabric A:

Cut 3 Squares 5 1/4″; cut in quarters diagonally making 12 triangles

Cut 12 Squares 2 1/2″

Fabric B:

Cut 6 Squares 5 1/4″; cut in quarters diagonally making 24 triangles

Cut 3 Squares 4 1/2″

Fabric C:

Cut 12 Squares 4 1/2″

Cut 3 Squares 5 1/4″; cut in quarters diagonally making 12 triangles

 

Alternate Cutting Instructions if Cutting from Kit

Fabric A:

Cut a 7 1/2″ strip. Cut the 3-5 1/4″ squares from the wide strip. The 27″ remaining of the

7 1/2″ strip will be used later.

Cut a 2 1/2″ strip; cut 12 squares. Thirteen inches of the strip will remain.

Fabric B:

Cut a 5 1/4″ strip from fabric B. Cut 6 squares.

After cutting the 6 squares, cut the remaining strip 4 ½” wide. Cut three 4 ½” squares.

Fabric C:

Cut a 4 1/2″ strip. Then cut nine 4 ½” squares.

Cut a 5 1/4″ strip. Cut three 5 ¼” squares, and then three 4 1/2″ squares from this strip.

 

Piecing the Blocks

For each block:

Create the Quarter Square Triangle unit:

Seam a Fabric A triangle to a Fabric B triangle, beginning on the straight edge. Repeat to create 4 triangle units.

Always seam with the yellow triangle on top.

Piecing

 

Piecing

If the points of the triangles seem to scoot out from under the foot, hold them together with a tweezers and guide them under the foot.

guiding the triangles under the foot

Seam a Fabric C triangle to a Fabric B triangle, beginning on the straight edge. Repeat to create 4 triangle units.

Always seam with the gray background on top.

Seam with the gray background on top

Press seams toward the yellow and the gray.

Press seams toward the yellow and the gray

Seam the two different triangle sets together to create a square.

Seam the two different triangle sets together to create a square

Create the Center Square

Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of 4 small Fabric A squares.

Place a square on each corner of the pink center square and sew on the diagonal line. Trim the excess to 1/4″. Repeat for all four sides.

Place a square on each corner of the pink center square and sew on the diagonal line

Finishing the block

Seam together a 4 1/2″ Fabric C square to a quarter square triangle unit.

Seam another 4 1/2″ Fabric C square to the other side. Make 2 units.

Take note as to the orientation of the center pieced square in the picture below. Always sew down the pink side.

Always sew down the pink side

Seam together the center square in between two quarter square triangle units as shown in the center row below.

Seam together the center square in between two quarter square triangle units

Stitch together the three rows to create a block. Repeat all the steps to make three blocks.

Stitch together the three rows to create a block

Set aside these three blocks for now if you are making the entire quilt. The entire quilt top will be pieced together before the final quilting of the layers is done.

Each month I give you instructions for a different quilting technique. Experiment with the techniques and when it comes time for the final quilting you will be ready to decide which quilting techniques you like best.

Also, join Denise Jones this month. She has a fabulous project using these three blocks and the techniques in the quilting lesson. Her next project will post on August 21st.

Free-motion Quilting: A Quilting Lesson

This month’s quilting lesson will be for free-motion quilting. With free-motion stitching, the feed dogs should be lowered. You will be manually moving the fabric and controlling the direction and the length of the stitches.

I will be working with the BERNINA Stitch Regulator. This foot helps to keep the stitch length even and consistent as you move the fabric. If you are a beginner, you may find that this foot will give you the confidence to try many free-motion techniques. If you are more experienced, the BERNINA Stitch Regulator offers the added security of consistent stitch length may give you the confidence you need to try even more challenging projects.

If you do not have a Stitch Regulator, any free motion foot will work. Here are three you might try.

Darning Foot #9     Embroidery Foot #15    Echo Quilting and Cutwork Foot #44

My favorite free-motion foot to use is Free-Motion Embroidery Foot #24 because it gives me the most visibility when stitching. Quilting Foot #29/29C will also give you more visibility. (Insert Pics #11 to #17)

 

Free-Motion Embroidery Foot #24             Quilting Foot #29             Quilting Foot #29C (for 9mm machines)

Free-motion Embroidery foot #24, Quilting foot #29 and 29C

 

So let’s attach the BERNINA Stitch Regulator or the free-motion foot of your choice and get started. Remember to BREATHE when you are doing free motion work!!!

If you are using the BERNINA Stitch Regulator, you will want to attach the soul of your choice.  The open sole is my favorite!

For how-to information for the Stitch Regulator, download the Just Quilt It – eBook: BERNINA Stitch Regulator or watch the BERNINA Quilting – Tool Tip – Understanding the BERNINA Stitch Regulator. Here you will learn about BSR Modes 1 and 2, stitch length, tension, and other valuable information.

After layering your block with batting and backing, begin at the point of the yellow square border by pulling up your bobbin thread. Stitch a gentle wavy line from this point to the opposite diagonal point of the yellow square.

Stitching a gentle wavy line

Continue to stitch gentle wavy lines to both sides of the first line.

Continue to stitch gentle wavy lines to both sides of the first line

You may wish to occasionally echo a line to add interest.

Echo a line to add interest

When you have successfully quilted the center as shown, rotate the quilt crosswise and stitch in the same area forming a “free-motion plaid”. Try not to turn the block as you are stitching the wavy lines. Experiment by moving the block in a back and forth direction, as well as up and down. These two directions are the beginnings of all over free-motion.

forming a “free-motion plaid”

When the center is complete, we will move on to the gray areas of the block.

quilting the grey areas of the block

The gray areas of the block can be quilted with any free-motion design of your choice. You may do a simple all over stipple or add your own style to it. Experiment and have fun.

quilting the grey areas of the block

Here is a picture of the back of my block so you will be better able to see the quilting.

back side of the quilted block

When it comes to free-motion quilting, you will need to practice to gain confidence. You also need to remember to breathe and R-E-L-A-X!

Card Basket Variation Block finished

2 thoughts on “Card Basket Variation Block and Free-Motion Quilting

  1. I modified the colors to make a table runner for my sister-in-law, who is hosting a mini-family reunion at her home in St Joseph Missouri to view the Great American Solar Eclipse August 21. I think it looks just like a full solar eclipse! I’d send a photo, but I don’t know how to attach it to the comment.

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